More Rain, High Winds and Mountain Snow on the Way

March 13, 2012

Meteorologist Melissa Frey’s Weather Discussion:

The high winds and snow have tapered off, but we’re not out of the woods just yet…the rest of this week it’s not going to be a question of whether or not it’s going to rain, but rather which variety of rain we’ll see each day.

A deep long trough of low pressure will continue to support storms moving through about every 24 hours all week.

Monday night’s storm is now east of the Cascades.  It brought in winds as high as 87mph at the coast and 51 mph in Eugene and then dropped five to eight inches of snow at the coast, and one to three inches in the valley.  By the time this storm is done tonight in the Cascades, they’ll see over a foot of fresh snow. (The full list of snow and wind reports are below)

Showers will taper off today and we’ll see dry conditions tonight through Wednesday morning.  Highs will be in the mid 40s with lows in the mid 30s tonight.

We’ll see another storm Wednesday, this will bring in light rain for the second half of the day.  Temperatures will be slightly warmer with this one because it’s coming more from the south than the north. The coast will see another round of high winds, not as high as Monday, but gusts to 60 mph are expected.

The next storm hits Thursday, this one packed an even bigger punch.  We’ll see another round of high winds for the coast and heavy rain for all of western Oregon.

We should catch a dry break Friday morning before the next storm rolls in Friday night.

This one will bring with it another arctic air mass which will once again drop freezing levels to at least 1,000 feet. for Saturday and Sunday.

Have a great rest of your day,
Meteorologist Melissa Frey
Follow me on Facebook and Twitter.

Here’s the full list of wind and snow reports from the National Weather Service:

LOCATION SUSTAINED GUST REPORT TIME
 --------------------------------------------------------------------- 
 LINCOLN CITY,OR (TAFT HS)........NA          87     0230 PM PDT 03/12
 PACIFIC CITY,OR..................44          87     0125 PM PDT 03/12
 GARIBALDI,OR NOS TIDE GAGE.......57          82     1054 AM PDT 03/12
 CAPE FOULWEATHER,OR..............44          81     1133 AM PDT 03/12
 CAPE MEARES,OR...................48          80     1145 AM PDT 03/12
 CLATSOP SPIT,OR..................57          79     0900 AM PDT 03/12
 LINCOLN CITY,OR..................38          77     0136 PM PDT 03/12
 NEWPORT,OR (YAQUINA BRIDGE)......53          77     0412 PM PDT 03/12
 GARIBALDI,OR NOS TIDE GAGE.......52          76     0206 PM PDT 03/12
 MT. HEBO,OR......................NA          76     0150 PM PDT 03/12
 CAPE DISAPPOINTMENT,WA...........60          75     0845 AM PDT 03/12
 MEGLER TOWER,WA..................50          72     0925 AM PDT 03/12
 BUOY 29..32 MI W OF ASTORIA,OR...52          67     0750 AM PDT 03/12
 BUOY 89..85 MI WNW OF TILLAMOOK..49          67     0350 AM PDT 03/12
 CANNON BEACH,OR..................NA          63     0957 AM PDT 03/12
 NEWPORT,OR JETTY (C-MAN).........46          61     0148 PM PDT 03/12
 TILLAMOOK,OR.....................NA          60     0205 PM PDT 03/12
 FLORENCE,OR......................40          60     0340 AM PDT 03/12
 OCEANSIDE,OR.....................NA          60     1248 PM PDT 03/12
 HATFIELD SCIENCE CTR NEWPORT,OR..NA          59     0125 PM PDT 03/12
 NEWPORT,OR AIRPORT...............44          58     0235 PM PDT 03/12
 ROCKAWAY BEACH,OR................NA          56     0645 AM PDT 03/12
 OCEAN PARK,WA....................NA          56     0910 AM PDT 03/12
 TIERRA DEL MAR,OR................NA          53     0104 PM PDT 03/12
 SEASIDE,OR.......................NA          52     0405 PM PDT 03/12
 ASTORIA,OR AIRPORT...............NA          51     1032 AM PDT 03/12
 YACHATS,OR.......................NA          51     0520 AM PDT 03/12
 TILLAMOOK,OR AIRPORT.............NA          51     0155 PM PDT 03/12
 LONG BEACH,WA....................NA          46     0745 AM PDT 03/12
 MARYS PEAK,OR....................55          83     0330 PM PDT 03/12
 NASELLE RIDGE,PACIFIC COUNTY.....47          83     1020 AM PDT 03/12
 HUCKLEBERRY,WA...................NA          54     0711 AM PDT 03/12
 CEDAR CREEK RAWS,OR..............NA          46     1110 AM PDT 03/12
 BLODGETT,OR......................NA          40     0858 AM PDT 03/12
 SALEM,OR.........................NA          68     0109 PM PDT 03/12
 SALEM,OR AIRPORT.................NA          56     1119 AM PDT 03/12
 EUGENE,OR AIRPORT................NA          51     1254 PM PDT 03/12
 FOREST GROVE,OR..................NA          51     0809 AM PDT 03/12
 MCMINNVILLE,OR AIRPORT...........NA          50     0957 AM PDT 03/12
 PORTLAND,OR AIRPORT..............NA          48     1053 AM PDT 03/12
 EUGENE,OR AIRPORT................NA          48     1118 AM PDT 03/12
 MCMINNVILLE,OR AIRPORT...........NA          47     0453 AM PDT 03/12
 SW PORTLAND,OR...................NA          45     1202 PM PDT 03/12
 LONGVIEW,WA NOS TIDE GAGE........NA          44     1048 AM PDT 03/12
 KELSO,WA.........................NA          43     0812 AM PDT 03/12
 HILLSBORO,OR AIRPORT.............NA          41     0927 AM PDT 03/12
 SCAPPOOSE,OR.....................NA          41     0525 AM PDT 03/12
 AURORA,OR........................NA          37     0632 AM PDT 03/12
 OAKRIDGE,OR......................NA          40     0107 PM PDT 03/12

 

LOCATION SNOW DURATION REPORT TIME
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------
 TILLAMOOK,OR...............8.5          8 HR        0115 AM PDT 03/13
 NEWPORT,OR.................6.0          6 HR        0102 AM PDT 03/13
 FLORENCE,OR................5.0          4 HR        1205 AM PDT 03/13
 WILSON RIVER, OR...........5.0          24 HR       0402 AM PDT 03/13
 LIVINGSTON MTN CAMAS,WA....5.5          4 HR        0206 AM PDT 03/13
 HAPPY VALLEY, OR...........5.0          6 HR        0609 AM PDT 03/13  
 BORING,OR..................4.0          UNKNOWN     0433 AM PDT 03/13
 CANBY,OR...................2.5          3 HR        0159 AM PDT 03/13
 HAPPY VALLEY,OR............2.0          UNKNOWN     0136 AM PDT 03/13
 LONGVIEW,WA AT 1150 FT.....2.0          UNKNOWN     1257 AM PDT 03/13
 CAMAS,WA...................2.0          1 HR        1110 PM PDT 03/12
 WASHOUGAL,WA...............2.0          UKN         0427 AM PDT 03/13
 MILWAUKIE,OR...............1.2          UNKNOWN     0317 AM PDT 03/12
 WILSONVILLE,OR.............1.1          UNKNOWN     0414 AM PDT 03/13
 SALEM,OR...................1.0          1 HR        1225 AM PDT 03/13
 GRESHAM,OR.................1.0          5 HR        0317 AM PDT 03/13
 JUNE LAKE, WA.............21.0          24 HR       0500 AM PDT 03/13
 SPENCER MEADOWS, WA.......19.0          24 HR       0400 AM PDT 03/13
 SHEEP CANYON, WA..........17.0          24 HR       0500 AM PDT 03/13
 SURPRISE LAKES, WA........15.0          24 HR       0500 AM PDT 03/13
 BENNETT PASS, MT HOOD, OR..9.0          24 HR       0335 AM PDT 03/13
 MT HOOD MEADOWS, OR........7.0          24 HR       0400 AM PDT 03/13
 GOVERNMENT CAMP, OR........7.0          24 HR       0400 AM PDT 03/13
 TIMBERLINE LODGE, OR.......6.0          24 HR       0404 AM PDT 03/13
 MCKENZIE, OR...............6.0          24 HR       0500 AM PDT 03/13
 ROARING RIVER, OR..........6.0          6 HR        0500 AM PDT 03/13
 WILLAMETTE PASS, OR........6.0          24 HR       0404 AM PDT 03/13
 TOMBSTONE, OR..............3.0          22 HR       0121 AM PDT 03/13
 CLACKAMAS LAKE, OR.........3.0          24 HR       0500 AM PDT 03/13
 WHITE RIVER, OR............2.0          24 HR       0404 AM PDT 03/13       

From Winter to Spring and Back Again

March 9, 2012

Meteorologist Melissa Frey’s Weather Discussion:

When the heat was turned on yesterday, there was no stopping it!  The high temperature in Eugene was 67 degrees!  That’s 12 degrees above average! The last time we hit 67 was 126 days ago on November 2nd.

It was also impressive that we got that warm after starting out at just 27 degrees, just one degree higher than the record low.

The ridge of high pressure that allowed for the warm sunny weather is now sliding east.  This opened the door to a weak cold front that will come in tonight.

We’ll see rain showers Friday night which will continue off an on Saturday.  This first storm isn’t all that impressive, but will set the stage for a long series of winter weather.

The next storm after this one moves in Saturday night/Sunday morning.  We’ll see rain, breezy conditions and cooler air ahead of this well developed cold front.  Also overhead, a long wave deep trough will pull down another round of arctic air, which will drop freezing levels to at least 2,000 feet Sunday and down to 1,500 feet Monday.

It doesn’t end there.  Cold air and soggy conditions will stick with us through Thursday.  A second cold front will move through Monday night and a third Wednesday.  The upper level flow at 500mb will rebound slightly Tuesday and Wednesday which will raise freezing levels, but only to about 4,000 feet. This means the passes will see good chances for snow Saturday night through Thursday.

Is looks like our La Nina winter is pulling though…but later than expected.

Have a great weekend,

Meteorologist Melissa Frey
Follow me on Facebook and Twitter.


Winter Weather and Flooding Advisory Update

December 30, 2011

WINTER STORM WARNING:

– North and Central Cascades including Lane County Cascades

– In effect Now through 12a Saturday

– Snow levels have dropped between 5,000 and 4,000 feet this morning and will drop to 3000 feet late Friday afternoon, between 2500-2000 feet overnight

– Snow Accumulations: 12-18 inches, with 2 to 3 feet above 6,000 or 7,000 feet.

 

WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY:

– Cascade Foothills and Coast Range

– In effect from 10a Friday through 12a Saturday

– Snow levels drop to near 2000 feet late Friday afternoon overnight into Saturday a few spots may see levels drop to around 1500 feet.

– Snow Accumulations: 3-6 inches (overnight mainly)

 

Travelers headed over the Passes late Friday or Saturday will see winter driving conditions, be prepared to take extra travel time and winter provisions.

 

We also have a ton of moisture out there. That’s why we’ve seen Flood Warnings for the Siuslaw River near Mapleton in Lane County, and Flood Watches for the North Cascade Foothills, Coast Range, and North and Central Coastal areas. While some of these advisories are set to disappear early in the day, there will still be some minor flooding that is just below warning criteria.


A Whole Lotta The Wet Stuff

December 29, 2011

Current Advisories - 6 AM

 

 

Wow, it has been a rainy, windy week so far, and we’ve still got two days to go! First let’s talk about the last wave of rain.  Originally the leading edge came in late Tuesday evening and held on through the entire day on Wednesday.  Winds ended up really jumping up as the band came onshore Tuesday. We saw gusts between 55 and 70 miles per hour along the coast. However, it was also very wind in the Coast Range and Cascades. In fact, Mary’s Peak reported at least one official wind gust of 79 mph, and I saw a preliminary report of 88 mph!

 

The rainfall is the big story. In the last 24-hours (as of 4 a.m.) we’ve picked up the following amount of rainfall:

 

That doesn’t count the rainfall that occurred from Tuesday evening and through the overnight hours. If you add that in, areas saw upwards of 1.50″ to 3.00″ plus of rainfall.  There were some flood watches posted for Siuslaw River in Lane County and the Siletz River in Lincoln County.  Those watches were allowed to expire at 4 a.m. this morning, however they may return soon. There is still a Flood Warning in effect for Grays River near Roseburg in Douglas County.  Through Thursday  morning, the drainage basins of the rivers mentioned accumulated between 4 and 6 inches.

Note: Both Watches Have Expired

 

 

What is amazing is just how much rainfall fell over such a short period of time in the Eugene area.  Remember, if we saw less than an inch of rainfall this last week of the month, we were going down in history as the driest December in record. That is no longer a concern! The Eugene area has picked up 2.79″ of rain since Tuesday! That means 92% of all of our rainfall this month happened in a 24 to 36 hour period! There is more rainfall on the way today!

 

 

After the rain on Thursday the next story will be the snow. That’s right, I said “snow.” Instead of catching waves of energy off the water, Friday’s stormy weather will be met with cool temperatures. Our high temperature of the day on Friday will be about 12:00 AM or around that time. After that time, our temps will fall throughout the afternoon. Those of us in the interior valleys will see temps down to the low 40’s by dinner. During that time, snow levels will drop from 5,500′ or so down to 3,000′ or perhaps 2,500′.  In lieu of that occuring, the National Weather Service has issued a couple of winter weather advisories. Here’s how they break down:

Coast Range/Cascade Foothills: Winter Weather Advisory from 2 PM Friday to 12:00 AM Saturday. By Friday afternoon, snow levels will drop down between 2,000 and 3,000 feet. During that time, the Coast Range and Foothills will see the changeover to snow. It is possible that levels could briefly drop to 1,500 feet. During this time, the two regions could see between 3 to 6 inches of snow. Snow fall will be in the form of snow showers by this point.

 

Lane Co. Cascades: Winter Storm Warning from noon Friday to midnight. Snow levels will start between 7,000 and 8,000 feet midnight Friday morning, but will drop to 5,000 feet by lunchtime and 3,000 feet or less by the afternoon/evening. Snow totals around the passes will be between 12 and 18 inches with higher amounts towards the peaks. Strong winds will significantly reduce visibility, so travel will be hazardous at times.

 

North OR Cascades: A Winter Storm Warning will be in effect from 8 AM Friday to midnight. The area will see the change over to snow by the early morning on Friday as snow levels will fall from 7,000′ Thursday evening to 5,000′ by Friday morning. From there, snow levels will continue to drop to 2,000′ to 3,000′. Snow accumulations will be high with this storm, with 12 to 18 inches of snow possible below 6,000 feet, and 2 to 3 feet above. Visibility will be near zero with heavy snow meeting with gusts up to 40 and 50 miles per hour.

 

The snow will be good news for the struggling ski resorts, but unfortunately travel for the early parts of the holiday weekend will be hazardous.  For New Years Eve and New Year’s Day, we’ll see dry weather. Our next band of rain will move in Monday early morning.

 

–Meteorologist, Megan Taylor

 

If you have travel plans, you can always check ODOT’s TripCheck Page. For the latest on Watches, Warnings, and Advisories, keep checking here or visit KEZI.com!


UFO? No! Fun Clouds!

December 27, 2011

Courtesy: Pam Robinson

So I’ve lived in Oregon for almost two years, and I’ve never seen with my eye the famous (well for meteorologists) lenticular clouds. So when I checked my Facebook page today and saw that Pam Robinson had posted a picture of these special clouds, I was so excited I skipped around the weather center! While I am nerding out in every way right now, you brought this on yourself by clicking on the weather blog! 🙂

 

Lenticular clouds, also known as lens clouds, have actually been reported to authorities as UFOs! While the photo above looks pretty obvious, add color and a different sun angle and they can look pretty strange. These clouds are formed mostly in the winter in the Pacific Northwest, because that’s generally when we have enough moisture through the entire column of air to form clouds. When the airflow goes over the mountains, it makes an undulating motion (up and down). It has to go up the mountain, and then falls down the lee side.  That causes turbulence to form on the lee side of the mountain, with small rises in the air.  So you get the airflow with tiny bumps where the small air rises occur.  That happens through more than one layer in the column of air, so that’s why they look like stacked pancakes.

 

 

Now to the forecast. After weeks of wondering if we’ll catch any significant rain/snow this month, Mother Nature is lining up a wash out! We have several waves of active weather lined up for the next few days. The first disturbance moved through last night and left a few showers in the northern regions this morning. This wave was pretty weak, and has just left cloud cover for many areas with rain totals only at a couple one-hundreths.

 

The next wave will not be so benign. We have High Wind Warnings out along most of the coast, as winds will begin to pick up this afternoon.  The High Wind Warning for the North and North Central Coast will be in effect from 6 p.m. tonight through 4 a.m. Wednesday morning.  Winds will be sustained between 30 and 40 miles per hour, with gusts of 50 miles per hour possible in coastal communities and 60 to 70 miles per hour around the headlands. The Warning for the South Central Coast will be effective from 4 p.m. today through 4 a.m. Wednesday.  Once again gusty winds along the area will be between 50 to 60 miles per hour.  After the warning expires for this region, a High Wind Watch is expected to take its place until Thursday morning.

 

Not only are we talking about wind, we’re talking about lots of the wet stuff.  The good news is….we need to stock up on rain while we can to avoid a spring drought.  The bad news, the snow in the mountains will become wet and slushy at the ski resorts for the next couple of days.  Rainfall will be very heavy at times, especially for Wednesday through Friday. We could easily see between 1 to 3 inches of rain in any location by the weekend, which would help prevent us from having the driest December on record.  Ski resorts really need some precipitation as well.  While snow levels will be up to 8,000 feet on Wednesday, I think they will fall completely below resort level again for Friday and Saturday, with a couple peaks picking up a foot or more of snow.

 

The one day I’m thinking we’ll be completely dry will be Sunday (so far). However, it will be right back to the rain again overnight into Monday, January the 2nd, 2012.  Hard to believe it is already time to celebrate the New Year!

 

— Meteorologist, Megan Taylor

 

For the full Wind Warnings, click here.


Not as Much Snow, but Adding In Winds

November 20, 2011

After a quick break from the wet weather, two storms are lining up to bring back the soggy conditions as well as some very windy days.

The National Weather Service has issued a High Wind Warning for the north and central coastal areas.  The warning is in effect from 1 am to noon on Monday for the beaches and headlands.  After the warning expires, a high wind watch will take over through Tuesday afternoon. The first front with these two storms will bring in south winds sustained at 30 to 40 miles per hour with gusts up to 60 to 65 mph near beaches and headlands.  Coastal communities can expect gusts between 45 and 50 miles per hour.

 

The second front will move in late Monday night through Tuesday.  Southerly winds will once again remain around 30 to 40 miles per hour.  Beaches and headlands, however, could see sustained winds of 40 to 50 miles per hour with gusts between 75 to 80 miles per hour.  Winds will decrease late Tuesday into Wednesday.

 

The National Weather Service has also issued a High Wind Watch for the South Central and Southern Oregon Coast.  The watch is in effect from Monday evening to Tuesday evening.

 

While these storms will not be as cold as the last, significant snow will likely fall in the higher elevations.  Snow levels will be higher, between 3,000 and 3,500 feet.  A Winter Weather Advisory has been issued for Northern Cascades for Monday from 5 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Snow accumulations will be between 4 to 7 inches.

 

Keep checking in at KEZI.com, our non-stop news channel KEZI 9+, and our live broadcasts of KEZI 9 News for more information.  Also check us out on Facebook and Twitter!


Quick Update to Melissa’s Post (BELOW)

November 16, 2011

Let’s also go ahead and add the newest advisory to the list Melissa created in the previous post.  The NWS has now issued a Winter Weather Advisory for the North and Central Coast Range and Cascade Foothills.   The advisory is in effect from 4 P.m. Thursday to 4 P.M. Friday.  The snow level will drop to 2,000′ by Thursday afternoon, and down to 1,500′ to 1,000′ Thursday night into Friday.  During that 24 hour period, up to 4 to 8 inches is expected for the Coast Range, and 6 to 10 inches for the Cascade Foothills.

The Eastern Douglas County Foothills will also begin picking up snow by overnight into Friday, with 3 to 6 inches or more expected above 2,500 feet.   I expect a possible winter weather advisory for portions of the Central Oregon East Slopes as well.

Speaking of Central Oregon, there is also a wind advisory in effect tonight through 4 A.M. Thursday for the East Slopes of the Cascades.  This includes the cities of Bend, Tumalo, and Sisters.  Winds will be sustained between 20 to 30 with gusts up to 40 to 50 mph possible.  This can make driving hazardous, especially in high-profile vehicles, and also minor property damage can occur.

 

–Meteorologist, Megan Taylor